DFO Video

Video

New England Contra Dance History - Old Timers Talk (1 of 6) - Bob McQuillenhttp://www.danceflurry.org/djones/images/external.png - After moderator David Millstone introduces the panel for a discussion of contra dance history in New England and upstate New York, piano player and tunesmith Bob McQuillen speaks about his early experience as a dance musician.

New England Contra Dance History - Old Timers Talk (2 of 6) - Ralph Sweethttp://www.danceflurry.org/djones/images/external.png - Connecticut dance caller Ralph Sweet describes his early experiences seeking out contra dances, in the mid-1940s, when all the dancing was singing squares.

New England Contra Dance History - Old Timers Talk (3 of 6) - Dudley Laufmanhttp://www.danceflurry.org/djones/images/external.png - Dudley Laufman, Canterbury, NH, talks about his early experiences as a dancer, musician, and caller. Among other experiences, he describes how he and other musicians were invited to the Newport Folk Festival in 1965 and the start of the Fox Hollow festival in upstate New York.

New England Contra Dance History - Old Timers Talk (4 of 6) - Bill Spencehttp://www.danceflurry.org/djones/images/external.png - Musician Bill Spence describes going to the Fox Hollow festival, learning there about the hammered dulcimer, and the start of Fennig's All-Stars as a band playing for dances in New York State in the 1970s.

New England Contra Dance History - Old Timers Talk (5 of 6) - Andy Spencehttp://www.danceflurry.org/djones/images/external.png - Andy talks about her experiences getting started as a dance caller in the early 1970s in upstate New York, opening Andy's Front Hall music business, the start of the Old Songs Festival, and the start of the Flurry Festival; she gives a shout-out to Paul Rosenberg (06:36) who was sitting in the audience, but the camera didn't get a glimpse of him.

New England Contra Dance History - Old Timers Talk (6 of 6http://www.danceflurry.org/djones/images/external.png) - David Millstone points out that "contra dance" as the name for an evening of dances only dates to the mid-1970s; before that, as Bob McQuillen testifies, it was simply a square dance. Andy Spence describes the various names used in New York state, and ends with a plea for dancers to be supportive of new callers.